Excisions

Wide-local Excision for Skin Cancer

In wide-local excision, the skin cancer and a small margin of healthy tissue around it is cut out, usually in a football-shaped ellipse. Once the tissue has been removed, the edges of the wound are sutured together. The tissue then is sent for processing and margin evaluation by a pathologist.

Wide-local excision often is used for Basal Cell Carcinoma and Squamous Cell Carcinoma on lower risk body sites such as the body, arms, and legs and for early stage melanomas that still are confined to the skin and have not spread into deep levels of tissue or other parts of the body. For small, well-placed tumors, it offers results that are both medically and cosmetically effective. It offers a high cure rate and allows for microscopic examination of surrounding tissue. The intent is to remove the entire lesion, but there is a possibility that the area requires further surgery in the event that the entire lesion was not removed in this procedure.

Benign Lesions

Benign refers to a condition, tumor, or growth that is not cancerous. This means that it does not spread to other parts of the body and is not dangerous or serious. In general, a benign tumor grows slowly and is not harmful. However, this is not always the case.

A benign tumor may grow big enough or be found near blood vessels, nerves, or organs those impinging on nearby structures thus causing pain. As a result, it can cause problems locally without spreading to another part of the body. In such cases it can be surgically removed and sent for microscopic examination. The intent is to remove the entire lesion, but there is a possibility that the area requires further surgery in the event that the entire lesion was not removed in the procedure. In addition, further medical or surgical treatment may be needed when the diagnosis is made.

Cyst

A cyst is a closed pocket or pouch of tissue. It can be filled with air, fluid, pus, or other material. Cysts are common on the skin. They can develop when acne causes a sebaceous gland to clog, or they can form around something that is stuck in the skin. These cysts are not cancer (benign) and typically occur on the head or trunk. Occasionally, they may cause pain, changes in appearance, become infected and need treatment due to pain and swelling.

Cysts can be drained or removed with surgery, depending on their type and location. Sometimes, a cyst looks like a skin cancer and may need to be removed to be tested.

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